ENGIE has a close interest in the potential of renewable gases to be the energy of the future: they include biogas, biomethane and renewable hydrogen. These green gases will be essential for the transformation of energy systems not only because of their suitability for supplementing other, inherently intermittent, renewable energy sources, but also because they will facilitate the energy transition at regional level by developing local resources and creating value, especially through the creation of local jobs.

ENGIE occupies a strong position at every link in the biomethane value chain, from project development in close collaboration with farmers, to end-customer sales. The Group has set itself the ambition of supporting the industrial transformation of the sector and achieving the target set out in the French Energy Transition for Green Growth Law of at least 10% gas consumption being met by green gases delivered through existing infrastructures by 2030. The Group is committed to becoming a key stakeholder in this market, and is already actively investing in developing, building and operating the first anaerobic digestion units in France and the Netherlands, and has many other projects underway around the world.

As a bridge between all energy systems (electrical, gas, liquid, etc.), hydrogen has the potential to span the majority of current energy uses. ENGIE is convinced of this fact, and is investing in the development of renewable hydrogen produced by water electrolysis. The Group has also set up an entity dedicated exclusively to delivering expertise at every key link in the value chain, from the production of green hydrogen through to the potential of hydrogen energy to power transportation, cities and industry, and its ability to store electricity generated from renewable sources.

How can you promote the use of gas in your network?

How can you promote the use of gas in your network?

To favor the production of electricity by gas-fired power stations and to develop the use of green gas contribute to the objective of decarbonisation of the territories.

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Natural gas, LNG, biomethane: how do they differ?

Natural gas, LNG, biomethane: how do they differ?

Natural gas, LNG, biomethane and hydrogen: explanations on their differences

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 Key figures for natural gas

Key figures for natural gas

Six key figures that demonstrate just how central gas is to the energy transition.

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Gas : 11 key words and phrases about energy transition you need to know

Gas : 11 key words and phrases about energy transition you need to know

Biomethane, biogas, cogeneration, NLG, Power-to-Gas: these are words we hear a lot when gas is mentioned in the context of energy transition. Do you know exactly what they mean?

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Why is gas central to the energy transition?

Why is gas central to the energy transition?

The transition to a world in which 100% of energy will come from renewable sources requires the use of storage technologies, and especially those made possible by hydrogen and natural gas infrastructures.

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 The energy mix question by Didier Holleaux, Executive Vice President of ENGIE

Diversification is the answer to the energy mix question

As the government prepares to redraw the roadmap that will guide French energy policy for the next five years, the question of the energy mix must be central to our thoughts and concerns.

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« Why the energy transition is (also) about gas » by Isabelle Kocher, CEO of ENGIE

« Why the energy transition is (also) about gas » by Isabelle Kocher, CEO of ENGIE

Natural gas is an essential energy source if we are ever to make the 100% renewables scenario a reality. Today, it is the best substitute for polluting energy sources and the necessary complement to renewables.

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What role does natural gas play in the energy transition?

What role does natural gas play in the energy transition?

Against a background of energy industry revolution, power generation needs to replace coal and oil with other energy resources to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

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Gas is a powerful lever for countering climate change

  • Power generation: substituting gas for coal throughout Europe would reduce the continent’s CO2 emissions immediately by up to 81% – source: Eurogas
  • Mobility: replacing diesel with gas could reduce emissions by: 100% for sulfur oxides, 90% for nitrogen oxides and 99 % for particulates